8 Best Budget Camera for Food Photography: (2024 Guide & Reviews)

Last Updated on December 5, 2023 by Sharon Advik

Imagine a beautiful bowl of ramen topped with succulent, glistening slices of chicken and a soft-boiled egg.

Peering inside the bowl at each ingredient, you could smell the intoxicating aroma wafting from rice noodles, the delicate fragrance of Japanese sea salt, or perhaps even a smoky chicken smell.

When you took a bite of the ramen, you’d feel firm but yielding noodles on your tongue, and at just the right consistency, it wouldn’t overwhelm your tastebuds.

These are some of the feelings people want when looking for a food photographer.

It’s about creating palpable images that leave your audience hungry for more.

And I’m here with the best budget cameras for food photography to help you avail mouthwatering food pictures.

Which are the Best Budget Camera for Food Photography?

Here are my recommended top 8 Best Budget Camera for Food Photography:-

Sony Alpha A7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Sony Alpha A7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I remember my first time shooting a pie for a food photography project.

I was nervous but also excited to be able to off the incredible work of the bakery that had been so generous to let me shoot their pies.

I arrived early in the morning before they opened up for business, and I took some test shots of some of their pies on display in the case.

It was fascinating to see how each pie looked and how it would look when sitting next to another one.

It gave me a great sense of how to compose these shots in an exciting way that would make them pop out at people looking at them online or in print.

And finally, the shoot started, and my Sony Alpha A7 was armed.

Features:

  • Model: Sony A7
  • Effective Megapixel: 24-MP
  • Image sensor type: Full-Frame Exmor CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 100 – 51200
  • Shutter speeds: 1/8000
  • Storage Compatibility: SD, SDHC, SDXC Memory
  • Viewfinder: Electronic Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Not Available
  • Dimension: 127 x 94 x 48mm
  • Weight: 474g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

The owner asked me if she could give me a tour of their kitchen so that I could see where all of their ingredients came from and how much work goes into making each batch of fresh pieces of bread and pastries every morning before opening hours start at 9 AM sharp!

This was when things started getting interesting: she showed me around their kitchen and told me about her favorite recipes for different loaves of bread like sourdough or brioche; how they make them.

I adjusted my ISO to 200 and shutter speed to 1/8000 to seize these details.

Aperture/Field of View:

It wasn’t easy getting everyone to look at the camera, especially since they were all so busy working on their tasks!

The aperture was set at f/3.5, and eventually, they got used to me being there and stopped paying attention.

That’s when I started getting some great shots of them rolling out dough and kneading it with their hands, which felt intimate, almost like we were all old friends hanging out together in a kitchen after dinner!

White Balance/Frame Rate:

If you’ve ever tried to shoot apple pie, you know it’s tough to get a crisp shot without getting an unwanted reflection on its shiny surface.

The trick is to use a custom white balance at 5 fps shooting speed, which allows me to set the white point manually instead of letting my camera do it for me.

This gave me more control over how my camera interprets light.

And the results were mouthwatering.

Why is this camera the best?

It is an affordable and versatile option for taking elemental and divine photos.

It’s lightweight, with a 24-megapixel sensor and excellent low-light performance.

The camera has a full-frame sensor that captures more light than other sensors, so poor lighting conditions don’t wash out your photos.

And it has a wide dynamic range, which means it can capture bright highlights and deep shadows in one shot without losing detail or quality.

Conclusion:

The Sony Alpha A7 is perfect for shooting food photography, especially where lighting conditions are often difficult to control and color balance can be tricky.

Indeed, the best budget camera for food photography.

Click here to buy yours!

Sony Alpha A7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony Alpha A7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony Alpha A7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Built-in Wireless (Wi-fi)
  • NFC Connectivity
  • Articulating Screen
  • Electronic Built-in Viewfinder
  • Face Detection Focusing
  • 24.0MP – High-Resolution Sensor
  • 25.600 Max ISO
  • 117 Focus Points
  • 1.230k dots LCD Resolution
  • 1/8000s High Shutter Speed
  • 474g Light Body
  • External Microphone Port
Cons
  • No Sensor shift Image Stabilization
  • No Touch Screen

Nikon D3500 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Nikon D3500 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I was so nervous the first time I shot buffalo wings for food photography.

I mean, it’s not like they’re delicate or anything.

They’re just chicken drumsticks but are also not the easiest to photograph.

They’re practically all bone, and the meat is messy.

But when I arrived at the shoot, everything was perfect.

This wasn’t just any buffalo wing shoot; it was a special one for the client’s new restaurant, which specialized in buffalo wings.

The client had set up an elaborate system of lighting and props to create an environment that would make the wings look delicious.

And Nikon D3500 made it yummiest.

Features:

  • Model: Nikon D3500
  • Effective Megapixel: 24.2 MP
  • Image sensor type: APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 100 – 25600
  • Shutter speeds: 1/4000
  • Storage Compatibility: SD, SDHC, SDXC Memory
  • Viewfinder: Optical Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Not Available
  • Dimension: 124 × 97 x 69.5mm
  • Weight: 415g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

I arrived at the restaurant and was immediately struck by its beauty.

The sun shone through various colorful decorations hanging from the ceiling, and people were everywhere eating, laughing, and drinking coffee.

The owner showed me around, introducing me to everyone he could find.

He told me how proud he was of his restaurant and how much it meant to have customers return repeatedly.

I captured some cinematic shots with a 1/4000 shutter speed and 100 ISO.

Aperture/Field of View:

The wings came.

They were hot, spicy, and juicy, just like Buffalo itself.

And they were made on-site by a chef who knew how to make things happen fast.

I used an aperture of f/5.6 and a shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second which allowed me to capture crisp details even in low light conditions and gave me some room for blur if desired later during post-processing.

The smell of cooking filled the air as they fried wings in oil.

The smell was intoxicating, even for those who weren’t eating the food.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

I turned the white balance to Auto while the frame rate was 5 fps.

The sun shone through the windows, making everything seem bright and cheery.

The air was filled with the aroma of buffalo wings, which had just been taken out of the oven.

A customer sat at one of the tables and ordered a plate of buffalo wings and fries.

He was about to take a bite when I snapped a shot of him closing his eyes and enjoying the flavor of wings.

Why is this camera the best?

The D3500 is an excellent choice for food photography because of its low-light capabilities and built-in Wi-Fi.

The camera has an Expeed 4 image processor, which helps it capture clear images even in low-light settings.

It also has a dedicated autofocus point at the center of the frame, so you can easily focus on your subject without moving around much.

The built-in Wi-Fi allows you to transfer photos from your camera directly onto your smartphone.

Conclusion:

If you’re looking for a budget camera perfect for food photography, the Nikon D3500 is the one to get.

It’s the best budget camera for food photography.

Click here to buy yours!

Nikon D3500 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Nikon D3500 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Nikon D3500 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Compact.
  • Affordable.
  • 24MP resolution.
  • 5fps continuous shooting.
  • Automatic image transfer via Bluetooth.
  • In-camera shooting guide for beginners.
Cons
  • Fixed LCD omits touch support.
  • No mic input.

Sony ZV-1 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Sony ZV-1 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

It was Thanksgiving, and I knew what that meant: hotdogs.

My mother’s kitchen was filled with the scent of frying meat and the sound of sizzling oil.

A pan on the stove bubbled with water and a few hotdogs swimming in it.

She turned off the burner, poured a package of buns into a basket, and then placed it on the microwave to toast.

I watched her from behind as she chopped onions and potatoes for the salad, mixing dressing from a jar as she went along.

She tossed everything in a large bowl and put it in the fridge until dinner.

I was ready with Sony ZV-1 to capture these special moments.

Features:

  • Model: Sony ZV-1
  • Effective Megapixel: 20.1 MP
  • Image sensor: Exmor R CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 125 – 12800
  • Shutter speeds: 1/2000
  • Storage: S.D., SDHC, SDXC Memory Card
  • Viewfinder: Pop-up Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Advance Image Stabilization
  • Dimension: 105.5 x 60.0 x 43.5mm
  • Weight: 294g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

It was a hot day.

The sun was beating down on my mother as she stood over the stove, cooking the hot dogs we would soon eat for dinner.

She had just finished grilling them and was ready to put them on the plate.

She reached for a plate and grabbed one of the hot dogs with a pair of tongs.

As she lifted it from the pan, I set my ISO to 100 – 12800 and shutter speed to 1/2000 to seize the beauty and warmth of home-cooked food in my frame.

Aperture/Field of View:

I was trying to capture the essence of the hot dogs; I wanted to show how they were cooked, their process, and how delicious they looked when plated.

I started with a wide shot at f/2.8 of my mom making the hot dogs in her kitchen, then zoomed in on her hands as she formed the patties.

The camera was positioned on a tripod so it could stay still while I used my hand to move around it and get close-ups of what she was doing with her hands.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

I had 14 frames per second shooting speed, allowing me to customize the white balance.

The light was coming through the window, so I set the white balance to 4500 Kelvin.

When Mother put hotdogs on plates and garnished them with condiments, I took more shots from above to show off their presentation.

Finally, I took a close-up shot of one of them so you could see how juicy and delicious they looked.

Why is this camera the best?

This camera is an excellent choice for those who want to get professional-looking photos without spending much money.

It’s also easy to use.

You can take pictures with it by holding the shutter button and moving around with the food. It’s even built-in artificial intelligence that helps you frame your shots perfectly!

You’ll love how this camera captures color and texture; you can even use it for other types of photography, like portraits or landscapes!

Conclusion:

Sony ZV-1 is the best budget camera for food photography, as it features a great sensor and lens and excellent image stabilization.

Click here to buy yours!

Sony ZV-1 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony ZV-1 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony ZV-1 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Compact form factor
  • Flip-out touch screen
  • Bright, sharp zoom lens
  • Excellent in-camera audio
  • External mic and flash support
  • 4K video capture
Cons
  • Limited touch features
  • No in-camera flash

Fujifilm X-T30 II (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Fujifilm X-T30 II (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I was so excited when I got the call from my boss, saying that I’d be shooting macaroni and cheese for a food photography project.

I mean, who wouldn’t be?

I’ve been doing this for years, and getting new projects is still exciting.

But this one was different from Fujifilm X-T30 II.

It wasn’t just any macaroni and cheese; it was macaroni and cheese from an authentic restaurant, which is one of the best restaurants in New York.

The owner of the restaurant had asked me to shoot photos for their menu redesign so that he could capture the true essence of what makes his restaurant so great: their world-famous macaroni and cheese.

Features:

  • Model: Fujifilm X-T30 II
  • Effective Megapixel: 24.1 MP
  • Image sensor: APS-C Format X-Trans CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 160 – 12800
  • Shutter speeds: 1/32000
  • Storage: S.D, SDHC, SDXC Memory Card
  • Viewfinder: Optical Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: In-body Image Stabilization
  • Dimension: 118 x 83 x 47mm
  • Weight: 383g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

The light was dim, but my ISO range extended to 160, which allowed me to capture some amazing shots even in low light conditions.

The camera’s 1/32000 shutter speed was also crucial in capturing these images, as it froze the motion of the boiling water used to cook the macaroni and cheese.

The restaurant has a traditional French style, so I wanted to capture that in my photos.

Aperture/Field of View:

The food was incredible, I had never had macaroni and cheese before, but it was amazing!

I shot the cooking process from start to finish with Aperture Priority mode, the chef preparing all the ingredients, mixing them, serving them, and watching us devour them.

It was a total sensory experience for me: The smell of cheese wafting through the air; seeing them mix everything; hearing them talk about their recipes; tasting the final product.

It was one of my favorite shoots to date!

White Balance/Frame Rate:

The film was shot at 30 fps, a common requirement for commercials, but it’s not something I’ve ever done before.

This made it simple to get the shots I wanted because the movement of my camera had to be very precise.

The shot where the cheese is being poured had to be done in one take, which was a challenge because everything had to move ideally within fractions of a second.

But, thanks to the white balance shift, every shot was perfectly captured.

Why is this camera the best?

With its ability to shoot in low light and high ISO, you’ll be able to capture all the details of your plate without worrying about blurry photos or grainy images.

The camera also has a wide range of focus modes that allow you to adjust how your subject appears in the shot without losing any detail.

For example, if you’re taking a close-up shot of a steak, you can have a shallow depth of field so that only the steak is focused while everything else is blurred out.

Conclusion:

If you want to take your food photography to the next level without spending thousands of dollars on expensive equipment, this is the best budget camera for food photography.

Click here to buy yours!

Fujifilm X-T30 II (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Fujifilm X-T30 II (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Fujifilm X-T30 II (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Proven 26MP BSI CMOS imaging
  • Up to 30fps capture with tracking focus
  • Fully formed lens system
  • High-quality Film Simulation profiles
  • Dial-based controls with the easy Auto option
  • Built-in flash
  • Works as a webcam
  • 4K30 and 1080p240 video
Cons
  • Undersized viewfinder
  • UHS-I memory card slot and small buffer limit burst capacity

Canon 90D (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Canon 90D (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

The day I shot the hamburger was one of the most exciting days of my life.

I knew it would be challenging, but I didn’t realize how much work goes into a project like this until I started working on it.

There were many things to consider, from the lighting to the camera angle and lens selection.

It took me months to find everything I needed, and even then, some things still didn’t work out.

But today was different; today was when everything finally came together with Canon 90D.

Features:

  • Model: Canon 90D
  • Effective Megapixel: 32.5 MP
  • Image sensor: APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 100 – 25600
  • Shutter speeds: 1/16000
  • Storage: S.D, SDHC, SDXC Memory Card
  • Viewfinder: Optical Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Digital Image Stabilization
  • Dimension: 140.7 x 104.8 x 76.8mm
  • Weight: 701g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

I wanted to ensure the burger looked delicious and perfect, so I used the incredible ISO range of 100 – 25600 and a fast shutter speed of 1/16000.

This got me to capture photos at different exposures and speeds without getting blurry images from camera shakes or motion blur.

I could capture everything from dark scenes with low light, like inside a bar during happy hour, all the way up to bright scenes outside on a summer day.

Aperture/Field of View:

The hamburger was hot, juicy, and ready to be eaten.

The lighting had been set up with a single light above the burger and two lights on either side, one white and one black, which would help me control the shadows and highlights on the burger.

I started with an aperture f/3.5 and kept shooting until I reached f/22.

For every shot, I changed my shutter speed by about two stops in either direction to get some variety in my images by having different amounts of blur from sharpness to blurriness.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

Food photography is about capturing the essence of the food, the texture, the colors, and even how it feels when you bite into it.

My photos must also look realistic; they should be something someone can make at home without too much effort or expense.

And that was how this hamburger in my camera looked; warm and comfortable.

All thanks to the 10-fps shooting speed and color controls on my camera.

Why is this camera the best?

The 90D has several features that make it easy for food photography.

The camera has an advanced sensor, which means that pictures taken will have a depth of field that makes them look crisp and professional.

The camera also features a 32-megapixel APS-C sensor, so you’ll get clear shots even when you’re zoomed in on your subject.

The DIGIC 7 image processor and an ISO range from 100-25600 (extendable up to 51200) play their role excellently in capturing mouthwatering stills.

Conclusion:

If you’re a food photographer, you know your chosen camera matters.

The Canon 90D is the best budget camera for food photography as it sets forth several features that make it a piece of cake to capture great shots.

Click here to buy yours!

Canon 90D (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon 90D (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon 90D (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • New 32.5MP image sensor.
  • 10fps capture with iTR tracking.
  • Vari-angle LCD.
  • Some dust and splash protection.
  • Optical viewfinder.
  • Mirrorless-quality autofocus for 4K video.
Cons
  • No sync socket.
  • Single memory card slot.

Sony Alpha A6000 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Sony Alpha A6000 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I was the first person to arrive at the restaurant.

It was 7:45 AM, and I was ready to start working.

The sun rose over the trees, and everything looked crisp and beautiful.

The kitchen was buzzing with activity; the chefs were moving around like clockwork, preparing for the day ahead.

They wore their signature uniform: white hats, shirts, and black pants or skirts.

Their movements were quick and efficient, but they seemed to be having fun.

It was as if they were dancing across the kitchen floor.

I was ready to capture fried chicken’s deliciousness in my Sony Alpha A6000.

Features:

  • Model: Sony Alpha A6000
  • Effective Megapixel: 24.3 MP
  • Image sensor: APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 100 – 25600
  • Shutter speeds: 1/4000
  • Storage: S.D, SDHC, SDXC Memory Card
  • Viewfinder: Electronic Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Not Available
  • Dimension: 120 x 67 x 45mm
  • Weight: 344g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

The chicken was fried in oil and coated with thick breadcrumbs.

With ISO 100-25600 range and shutter speed ranging from 1/4000 – 30 seconds, I wanted to get a shot of the chicken as it went into the fryer and was removed from it.

I wanted those shots to look crisp and clear and show off just how crispy the breadcrumbs were.

But I also didn’t want to get caught up in ensuring every part of the fried chicken was perfectly exposed and crisp.

Aperture/Field of View:

We were in the kitchen with a softbox lighting setup, and I wanted to capture the beauty of the chicken’s crispy exterior and golden-brown skin.

The camera was set up at F/2 aperture to get the right amount of light on the chicken.

I needed to shoot at such a wide aperture because the softbox was close to the food. I wanted to ensure that I got enough light all over it to look evenly cooked.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

The owner and chef of the restaurant had been working on this recipe for years, and he wanted to make sure it was presented in the best way possible.

I needed to shoot at 11 fps to capture all the action in one shot.

The white balance system had to be authentic, too; otherwise, it would look off when uploaded to social media platforms.

Luckily, my camera performed phenomenally well, and I aced this food photography project.

Why is this camera the best?

With the A6000, you can take advantage of the CMOS sensor.

This means your photos will have less noise, more detail, and more dynamic range.

The camera will also allow you to shoot in RAW format, meaning you can make all kinds of adjustments when editing your photos, like white balance and more.

It features an autofocus system with 179 phase-detection points and 25 contrast-detection points.

Conclusion:

The Sony Alpha A6000 is the best budget camera for food photography as it’s a mirrorless camera that will allow you to get even more out of your lenses.

Click here to buy yours!

Sony Alpha A6000 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony Alpha A6000 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Sony Alpha A6000 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Incredibly fast autofocus.
  • 11.1fps burst shooting with tracking focus.
  • Excellent high ISO image quality.
  • Sharp OLED EVF.
  • Tilting rear display.
  • In-body flash and multi-function hot shoe.
  • Wi-Fi with NFC.
  • Downloadable camera apps.
  • 1080p60 video capture.
Cons
  • Lacks analog mic input.
  • Some apps must be purchased.

Canon EOS Rebel T7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Canon EOS Rebel T7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I’ve been shooting food photography for years, but I’ll never forget the first time I shot meatloaf.

It was a project for a traditional restaurant, and they wanted a photo of their meatloaf in front of a beautiful sunset.

They’d provided me with some gorgeous beefy-looking beef slices and two gorgeous loaves of bread (one white, one whole wheat) already sliced open.

But when I arrived at the shooting site, a secluded beach on the Oregon coast, I realized they hadn’t thought through how we’d get those two loaves to look like they were cut open and ready to eat.

Features:

  • Model: Canon EOS Rebel T7
  • Effective Megapixel: 24.1 MP
  • Image sensor type: APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 100 – 6400
  • Shutter speeds: 1/4000
  • Storage Compatibility: SD, SDHC, SDXC Memory
  • Viewfinder: Electronic Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Not Available
  • Dimension: 129 x 101.3 x 77.6mm
  • Weight: 475g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

The client wanted me to take photos at different stages of cooking the meatloaf, so it had to be done in one day.

I needed lots of natural light, so we shot from various angles.

It was a challenge because many variables could affect the outcome: different ovens and pans, different kinds of meatloaf mix, and different temperatures.

Still, they all came together perfectly with 100 – 6400 ISO and 1/4000 shutter speed.

Aperture/Field of View:

Meatloaf is not a complicated dish by any stretch of the imagination, but it has a lot of different textures and colors that don’t always play well together in a photograph.

I knew that getting close enough to the meatloaf would help me capture all of its detail, but as soon as I zoomed in on the food, it lost its appeal.

You couldn’t see what made it enjoyable anymore.

The solution?

Canon’s F/6.0 aperture lens!

This lens gave me everything I needed to get the job done.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

Once I got past the initial hurdles, like figuring out how to set up the camera and how to frame the shot, it turned out that shooting meatloaf was quite simple.

And if I wanted to make sure my photos were perfect, there were two things I needed to do: use a tripod and shoot at 3 fps.

The tripod kept the images sharp even when shooting in low light (which was good because there were a lot of shadows), while 3 fps ensured that all those shadows came out in crisp detail without blurring or smudging.

Why is this camera the best?

This camera has all the features necessary to create beautiful food photography without breaking the bank.

In particular, its autofocus system makes it easy to get your shot right and lets you take photos quickly, so you don’t miss out on fleeting opportunities.

It also has a 24-megapixel sensor that captures stunning detail in every shot.

And with its built-in Wi-Fi capabilities, uploading your photos to social media is simple and seamless.

Conclusion:

If you’re looking for a camera to help you create beautiful food photography without breaking the bank, this is the best budget camera for food photography.

Click here to buy yours!

Canon EOS Rebel T7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon EOS Rebel T7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon EOS Rebel T7 (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • 24MP image sensor.
  • On-screen shooting guide.
  • Raw support.
  • Sharp LCD.
  • Wi-Fi-enabled.
  • Inexpensive.
Cons
  • Fixed rear LCD without touch input.
  • Slow 3fps burst rate.

Canon EOS T8i (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Canon EOS T8i (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

I was so excited to shoot this project!

I love the idea of food photography and was stoked when I saw the pizza.

It was a cheese burst pizza, a combination of a cheese blast pizza and a mini pizza.

It’s the best of both worlds: you get more cheese than on just one slice, but it’s not as big as ordering two full-size pizzas.

I was nervous about the shooting, but it was pretty easy and tasty once I started!

The client gave me lots of tips on keeping the pizza warm while we shot, and they also let me take some bites while we were working so that I could see what it tasted without having to order one myself.

I opted for Canon EOS T8i for this technical job.

Features:

  • Model: Canon EOS T8i
  • Effective Megapixel: 24 MP
  • Image sensor: APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • ISO range: 125 – 25600
  • Shutter speeds: 1/4000
  • Storage: S.D, SDHC, SDXC Memory Card
  • Viewfinder: Electronic Viewfinder
  • Image stabilizer: Not Available
  • Dimension: 131 x 103 x 76mm
  • Weight: 515g

ISO/Shutter Speed:

When I first saw the list of ingredients for Burst Pizza, I thought to myself, “What a delicious-sounding dish!

How can I make this pizza look even more delicious?”

I started by setting my camera’s ISO range to 100 – 25600 and then shooting at 1/4000 shutter speed.

I knew that if I used a higher ISO, the image would be too grainy, but if I went any lower, the image would be too dim.

I had to find just the right balance between these two elements.

The result?

A beautiful shot of Burst Pizza made me want to eat my screen!

Aperture/Field of View:

I wanted to shoot it dynamically, so I was looking for something to let me do that.

The client wanted a shot where you could see all the different cheese flavors bursting out from the pizza.

So, I put on my aperture priority mode and set my camera to f/5.6.

This is wide, but then again, so is the lens!

So, if you’re using a 50mm or even wider lens, you might want to go even wider than that.

White Balance/Frame Rate:

I wanted a bold color palette that would pop on camera.

The goal was to create an image that looked like it could be right off the screen of your phone or tablet, something bright and delicious looking enough that you’d want to bite into it right away!

The shoot itself was fun: I used 4K UHD resolution at 23 fps speed with custom white balance, ensuring every shot looked terrific from start to finish.

Why is this camera the best?

Regarding food photography, you need a camera that can capture both the bright and the dark.

It is one of the best cameras for this because of its automatic light metering system.

The T8i also has an 18-55mm lens, giving it a wide range of focal lengths and making it easier to get close to your subject without moving around too much.

The lens is also perfect for taking photos in low-light situations, like restaurants with dim lighting or bright sunny days without shade.

Conclusion:

There are many reasons why the Canon EOS T8i is the best budget camera for food photography.

And my favorite reason is it’s accessible at an affordable price range.

Click here to buy yours!

Canon EOS T8i (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon EOS T8i (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography) Canon EOS T8i (Best Budget Camera for Food Photography)

Pros
  • Familiar design
  • Compatibility with Canon lenses and flashes
  • 24MP photos
  • Quick autofocus for stills and video
Cons
  • Limited focus area when using the viewfinder

CONCLUSION:

Alright, guys, that concludes all the cameras we will discuss today in this article.

Do you guys have any experience with these cameras? What are your thoughts on them?

Which is your Best camera for food photography?

Is there a camera that I didn’t mention in this article that you love to use?

Would you please leave your thoughts and comments below?

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